TopNews Trucking (Mostly) Welcomes Electronic Log Rule December 10, 2015 By David Cullen SHARING TOOLS | PrintSubscribe Share on emailShare on facebookShare on twitterShare on linkedinMore Sharing Services 1 Photo: Omnitracs Photo: Omnitracs UPDATED: Given how much industry feedback — dating back five years — informed the writing of the electronic logging device mandate announced Thursday, it’s not surprising that stakeholder reaction right out of the gate is mostly positive, with owner-operators marking the exception. The final rule, scheduled to be officially published Friday, Dec. 11, requires truck and bus drivers who currently use paper log books to adopt ELDs within two years. Carriers currently using electronic logs will get an extra two years to switch to compliant technology. The American Trucking Associations and the Truckload Carriers Association expressed positive reactions Thursday, while comments from the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association seem to indicate a potential legal challenge. The American Trucking Associations said that it was “pleased” the rule is now out, stating that the mandate will help improve both safety and efficiency for the industry. ATA noted that securing a regulation requiring ELDs to monitor driver hours-of-service had been a “top priority” since 2010. “Today is truly a historic day for trucking,” said ATA President and CEO Bill Graves. “This regulation will change the trucking industry – for the better – forever. An already safe and efficient industry will get more so with the aid of this proven technology.” Dave Osiecki, ATA executive vice president and chief of national advocacy, said the lobby “looks forward to working closely with FMCSA, state law enforcement agencies, as well as our members and industry partners during the two-year transition to full implementation of this safety technology.” David Heller, director of safety and policy for the Truckload Carriers Association, told HDT that there’s nothing unexpected in the rule. “TCA applauds the efforts of FMCSA in promulgating an Electronic Logging Device regulation that aids in alleviating some of the burdens regarding supporting documents, eases compliance with the Hours-of-Service Regulations and furthers the efforts of the agency in the fight against driver coercion and harassment.” Heller also said the rule “clearly relieves carriers and drivers of furnishing supporting documents pertaining to on-duty/driving time. It also outlines the performance specs for ‘FMCSA Compliant'” ELDs, which will aid carriers when finding a device that is practical for their fleets. And he noted that the mandate also appears to exempt drivers of trucks built before model year 2000, as they “lack the electronic feasibility to incorporate ELDs with those engines.” Not everyone’s happy However, in remarks to its own Land Line magazine and on the Road Dog Radio trucking channel on Sirius XM, OOIDA Vice President Todd Spencer indicated the association might challenge the rule. Again. The Journal of Commerce reported that Spencer told Sirius XM radio host Mark Willis, “We’re not going to lay down for regulatory overreach.” “Do electronic logging devices truly improve highway safety? Nothing has been presented to indicate that, in fact, that is true. In fact, we see the opposite,” he said in a Land Line magazine article online. “Onboard recorders are all about productivity and enhancing productivity, which basically puts those in constant conflict with the legitimate safety needs of drivers,” Spencer said. The article reported the association is reviewing the regulation and that it will “make FMCSA fully justify the mandate.” Spencer said the association challenged the Department of Transportation’s 2010 final rule mandating electronic onboard recorders in a federal appeals court and won in 2011, forcing the FMCSA to rewrite the rule. “Our strategy will simply be the same this time,” he said, according to the JOC article. Working on compliant products Suppliers of electronic logs have already begun pointing out that they will have product in place to ensure truck operators can meet the mandate once it kicks in two years from now. For example, Continental Commercial Vehicles & Aftermarket announced on Dec. 10 that its VDO RoadLog ELDs and software will meet the rule’s standards for hardware, software, connectivity methods and integration with the vehicle’s engine as well as be tamper-resistance. “We’re pleased to know that VDO RoadLog will be compliant with the FMCSA ELD rule, even though the devices required by the new rule are more technologically advanced than those required by the previous EOBR rule from 2010,” said Continental ELD Program Manager Alexis Capelle. ELD provider Zonar announced as well on Dec. 10 that it is “primed to help fleet managers work towards compliance by the time the rules go into effect in two years.” “When the ELD mandate was first proposed, we didn’t want to be a ‘me too’ solution provider,” said Fred Fakkema, vice president of compliance at Zonar Systems. “We wanted to leverage our experience and existing solutions to be at the forefront of a mandate that will help save lives and boost efficiency for both motor carriers and enforcement.” Fakkema advised that “fleets without an existing ELD designed to adapt to the mandate will need to take a strategic approach and work back from when its fleet needs to be compliant to where its fleet is now, including all the steps in between. “Getting a fleet and its drivers to switch from paper logs to a technology they may not be familiar with has an inherent learning curve,” he added. “Our objective is to help fleets make this as a seamless process as much as possible.” Updated 7:30 EDT 12/10/2015 to add OOIDA information. Editor in Chief Deborah Lockridge contributed to this article. Related: For Whom the ELD Bell Tolls Tags: FMCSA, ELDs, Hours of Service, Regulations

TopNews

Trucking (Mostly) Welcomes Electronic Log Rule

December 10, 2015

By David Cullen

Photo: Omnitracs
Photo: Omnitracs

UPDATED: Given how much industry feedback — dating back five years — informed the writing of the electronic logging device mandate announced Thursday, it’s not surprising that stakeholder reaction right out of the gate is mostly positive, with owner-operators marking the exception.

The final rule, scheduled to be officially published Friday, Dec. 11, requires truck and bus drivers who currently use paper log books to adopt ELDs within two years. Carriers currently using electronic logs will get an extra two years to switch to compliant technology.

The American Trucking Associations and the Truckload Carriers Association expressed positive reactions Thursday, while comments from the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association seem to indicate a potential legal challenge.

The American Trucking Associations said that it was “pleased” the rule is now out, stating that the mandate will help improve both safety and efficiency for the industry. ATA noted that securing a regulation requiring ELDs to monitor driver hours-of-service had been a “top priority” since 2010.

“Today is truly a historic day for trucking,” said ATA President and CEO Bill Graves. “This regulation will change the trucking industry – for the better – forever. An already safe and efficient industry will get more so with the aid of this proven technology.”

Dave Osiecki, ATA executive vice president and chief of national advocacy, said the lobbylooks forward to working closely with FMCSA, state law enforcement agencies, as well as our members and industry partners during the two-year transition to full implementation of this safety technology.”

David Heller, director of safety and policy for the Truckload Carriers Association, told HDT that there’s nothing unexpected in the rule.

“TCA applauds the efforts of FMCSA in promulgating an Electronic Logging Device regulation that aids in alleviating some of the burdens regarding supporting documents, eases compliance with the Hours-of-Service Regulations and furthers the efforts of the agency in the fight against driver coercion and harassment.”

Heller also said the rule “clearly relieves carriers and drivers of furnishing supporting documents pertaining to on-duty/driving time. It also outlines the performance specs for ‘FMCSA Compliant'” ELDs, which will aid carriers when finding a device that is practical for their fleets.

And he noted that the mandate also appears to exempt drivers of trucks built before model year 2000, as they “lack the electronic feasibility to incorporate ELDs with those engines.”

Not everyone’s happy

However, in remarks to its own Land Line magazine and on the Road Dog Radio trucking channel on Sirius XM, OOIDA Vice President Todd Spencer indicated the association might challenge the rule. Again.

The Journal of Commerce reported that Spencer told Sirius XM radio host Mark Willis, “We’re not going to lay down for regulatory overreach.”

“Do electronic logging devices truly improve highway safety? Nothing has been presented to indicate that, in fact, that is true. In fact, we see the opposite,” he said in aLand Line magazine article online. “Onboard recorders are all about productivity and enhancing productivity, which basically puts those in constant conflict with the legitimate safety needs of drivers,” Spencer said. The article reported the association is reviewing the regulation and that it will “make FMCSA fully justify the mandate.”

Spencer said the association challenged the Department of Transportation’s 2010 final rule mandating electronic onboard recorders in a federal appeals court and won in 2011, forcing the FMCSA to rewrite the rule. “Our strategy will simply be the same this time,” he said, according to the JOC article.

Working on compliant products

Suppliers of electronic logs have already begun pointing out that they will have product in place to ensure truck operators can meet the mandate once it kicks in two years from now.

For example, Continental Commercial Vehicles & Aftermarket announced on Dec. 10 that its VDO RoadLog ELDs and software will meet the rule’s standards for hardware, software, connectivity methods and integration with the vehicle’s engine as well as be tamper-resistance.

“We’re pleased to know that VDO RoadLog will be compliant with the FMCSA ELD rule, even though the devices required by the new rule are more technologically advanced than those required by the previous EOBR rule from 2010,” said Continental ELD Program Manager Alexis Capelle.

ELD provider Zonar announced as well on Dec. 10 that it is “primed to help fleet managers work towards compliance by the time the rules go into effect in two years.”

“When the ELD mandate was first proposed, we didn’t want to be a ‘me too’ solution provider,” said Fred Fakkema, vice president of compliance at Zonar Systems. “We wanted to leverage our experience and existing solutions to be at the forefront of a mandate that will help save lives and boost efficiency for both motor carriers and enforcement.”

Fakkema advised that “fleets without an existing ELD designed to adapt to the mandate will need to take a strategic approach and work back from when its fleet needs to be compliant to where its fleet is now, including all the steps in between.

“Getting a fleet and its drivers to switch from paper logs to a technology they may not be familiar with has an inherent learning curve,” he added. “Our objective is to help fleets make this as a seamless process as much as possible.”

Updated 7:30 EDT 12/10/2015 to add OOIDA information. Editor in Chief Deborah Lockridge contributed to this article.

December 10, 2015

By David Cullen

Photo: Omnitracs
Photo: Omnitracs

UPDATED: Given how much industry feedback — dating back five years — informed the writing of the electronic logging device mandate announced Thursday, it’s not surprising that stakeholder reaction right out of the gate is mostly positive, with owner-operators marking the exception.

The final rule, scheduled to be officially published Friday, Dec. 11, requires truck and bus drivers who currently use paper log books to adopt ELDs within two years. Carriers currently using electronic logs will get an extra two years to switch to compliant technology.

The American Trucking Associations and the Truckload Carriers Association expressed positive reactions Thursday, while comments from the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association seem to indicate a potential legal challenge.

The American Trucking Associations said that it was “pleased” the rule is now out, stating that the mandate will help improve both safety and efficiency for the industry. ATA noted that securing a regulation requiring ELDs to monitor driver hours-of-service had been a “top priority” since 2010.

“Today is truly a historic day for trucking,” said ATA President and CEO Bill Graves. “This regulation will change the trucking industry – for the better – forever. An already safe and efficient industry will get more so with the aid of this proven technology.”

Dave Osiecki, ATA executive vice president and chief of national advocacy, said the lobbylooks forward to working closely with FMCSA, state law enforcement agencies, as well as our members and industry partners during the two-year transition to full implementation of this safety technology.”

David Heller, director of safety and policy for the Truckload Carriers Association, told HDT that there’s nothing unexpected in the rule.

“TCA applauds the efforts of FMCSA in promulgating an Electronic Logging Device regulation that aids in alleviating some of the burdens regarding supporting documents, eases compliance with the Hours-of-Service Regulations and furthers the efforts of the agency in the fight against driver coercion and harassment.”

Heller also said the rule “clearly relieves carriers and drivers of furnishing supporting documents pertaining to on-duty/driving time. It also outlines the performance specs for ‘FMCSA Compliant'” ELDs, which will aid carriers when finding a device that is practical for their fleets.

And he noted that the mandate also appears to exempt drivers of trucks built before model year 2000, as they “lack the electronic feasibility to incorporate ELDs with those engines.”

Not everyone’s happy

However, in remarks to its own Land Line magazine and on the Road Dog Radio trucking channel on Sirius XM, OOIDA Vice President Todd Spencer indicated the association might challenge the rule. Again.

The Journal of Commerce reported that Spencer told Sirius XM radio host Mark Willis, “We’re not going to lay down for regulatory overreach.”

“Do electronic logging devices truly improve highway safety? Nothing has been presented to indicate that, in fact, that is true. In fact, we see the opposite,” he said in aLand Line magazine article online. “Onboard recorders are all about productivity and enhancing productivity, which basically puts those in constant conflict with the legitimate safety needs of drivers,” Spencer said. The article reported the association is reviewing the regulation and that it will “make FMCSA fully justify the mandate.”

Spencer said the association challenged the Department of Transportation’s 2010 final rule mandating electronic onboard recorders in a federal appeals court and won in 2011, forcing the FMCSA to rewrite the rule. “Our strategy will simply be the same this time,” he said, according to the JOC article.

Working on compliant products

Suppliers of electronic logs have already begun pointing out that they will have product in place to ensure truck operators can meet the mandate once it kicks in two years from now.

For example, Continental Commercial Vehicles & Aftermarket announced on Dec. 10 that its VDO RoadLog ELDs and software will meet the rule’s standards for hardware, software, connectivity methods and integration with the vehicle’s engine as well as be tamper-resistance.

“We’re pleased to know that VDO RoadLog will be compliant with the FMCSA ELD rule, even though the devices required by the new rule are more technologically advanced than those required by the previous EOBR rule from 2010,” said Continental ELD Program Manager Alexis Capelle.

ELD provider Zonar announced as well on Dec. 10 that it is “primed to help fleet managers work towards compliance by the time the rules go into effect in two years.”

“When the ELD mandate was first proposed, we didn’t want to be a ‘me too’ solution provider,” said Fred Fakkema, vice president of compliance at Zonar Systems. “We wanted to leverage our experience and existing solutions to be at the forefront of a mandate that will help save lives and boost efficiency for both motor carriers and enforcement.”

Fakkema advised that “fleets without an existing ELD designed to adapt to the mandate will need to take a strategic approach and work back from when its fleet needs to be compliant to where its fleet is now, including all the steps in between.

“Getting a fleet and its drivers to switch from paper logs to a technology they may not be familiar with has an inherent learning curve,” he added. “Our objective is to help fleets make this as a seamless process as much as possible.”

Updated 7:30 EDT 12/10/2015 to add OOIDA information. Editor in Chief Deborah Lockridge contributed to this article.


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