Lawless: The Obama Administration’s Unprecedented Assault on the Constitution and the Rule of Law

Lawless: The Obama Administration’s Unprecedented Assault on the Constitution and the Rule of Law

Book Forum

Wednesday, January 6, 2016
12:00PM – 1:30PM

Featuring the author David E. Bernstein, Professor, George Mason University School of Law; with comments by Ilya Shapiro, Senior Fellow, Constitutional Studies, Cato Institute. Moderated by Roger Pilon, Vice President, Legal Affairs, Cato Institute.

During his first presidential run, Barack Obama repeatedly promised to roll back the imperial presidency that had grown inexorably over the past half century. Then he was elected. Since 2009 Obama has claimed unprecedented power for himself while advancing a novel argument about his duty as president to ignore the separation of powers and act unilaterally to overcome congressional gridlock. “We can’t wait,” has been his refrain — though he has, of course, been unable to cite a “presidential power when Congress won’t act” clause in the Constitution in defense of his actions. In Lawless, George Mason University law professor David Bernstein takes readers on a whirlwind tour through the Obama administration’s bureaucratic overreaching; dubious assertion of executive authority over both foreign and domestic policy; unilateral changes, modifications, and delays to existing law; and implausible interpretations of constitutional law. Obama’s defenders, however, claim that he has actually been restrained compared to his predecessors and that claims of rampant illegality amount to not much more than partisan sniping. Who’s right? To help us untangle the legal web, the author of this provocative new book will be joined by Ilya Shapiro.

REGISTER  or Watch online Jan 6

The Economics of Immigration: Market-Based Approaches, Social Science, and Public Policy

Book Forum

Wednesday, January 6, 2016
4:00PM – 5:30PM

Featuring contributors Zac Gochenour, Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics, Western Carolina University; and Alex Nowrasteh, Immigration Policy Analyst, Cato Institute; with comments by Neil Ruiz, Executive Director of the Center for Law, Economics, and Finance, George Washington University. Moderated by Benjamin Powell, Director, Free Market Institute, and Professor of Economics, Rawls College of Business, Texas Tech University.

In his new book The Economics of Immigration: Market-Based Approaches, Social Science, and Public Policy, editor and economics professor Benjamin Powell brings together several immigration scholars to discuss how immigrants affect the wages of American workers and government budgets, as well as how they assimilate into American culture. The book also presents different policy recommendations in light of the economic evidence—including proposals for a market in visas, open borders, and cuts in legal immigration. The authors and editor will be joined by Neil G. Ruiz, PhD, Executive Director of the Center for Law, Economics, and Finance at George Washington University, who will offer his own comments and criticisms. Please join us as four economists discuss the economic impact of immigration.

REGISTER  or Watch online Jan 6

The Assassin’s Veto

Policy Forum

Thursday, January 7, 2016
12:00PM – 1:30PM

Featuring Robert Corn-Revere, Adjunct Scholar, Cato Institute, and Partner, Davis Wright Tremaine LLP. Moderated by John Samples, Vice President and Publisher, Cato Institute.

On the morning of January 7, 2015, Cherif and Said Kouachi, two brothers deeply offended by satirical drawings of the Muslim prophet Mohammad published in the French weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo, exacted their own punishment for perceived blasphemy. They forced their way into a staff meeting in the newspaper’s offices and massacred 12 people. The phenomenon of killing or threatening to kill those who insult you or your way of life has come to be known as the assassin’s veto. Where should the law come down on this? Should it defend free expression at all costs no matter how inflammatory or who is offended? Or should it permit the state’s coercive power to silence those who trade in insult or invective? This conflict poses a fundamental question: how much expression must a free society tolerate? European nations have often restricted “extreme speech” while the United States has protected speech short of immediate incitement to violence. Yet Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer has urged his fellow jurists to learn from the laws of other nations. Should the United States sustain its broad protections for speech or find a better, more European balance between freedom and other values?

REGISTER  or Watch online Jan 7

Watch Recent Events

Policing in America
Conference
December 1, 2015


Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailby feather