BLOG POSTS FROM DAILY ECONOMY AIER’s Daily Economy offers a place for readers at all levels of economic expertise to learn how the economy impacts their day-to-day lives. Our posts

January 22, 2016

BLOG POSTS FROM DAILY ECONOMY
 
AIER’s Daily Economy offers a place for readers at all levels of economic expertise to learn how the economy impacts their day-to-day lives. Our posts cover everything from the latest Federal Reserve announcements to consumer price trends to debates over student loans and the future of Social Security. By providing thoughtful commentary and context about current economic issues, we want to give readers the tools they need to act as informed financial citizens.

We’re on pace for a January stock market loss as bad as we’ve ever seen. What lessons can we glean from historical data? Let’s look at the worst January returns in history, and then what happened in the months that followed.

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by Jia Liu

Fascinating as the free fall in the stock prices might be, stock prices are not directly relevant to consumers. In December, consumers were paying more for services than for goods, which is consistent with the trend over the past 20 years.

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by Aaron Nathans

The American Institute for Economic Research forecasts a relatively low risk of recession in the months ahead, with consumers driving growth, according to the new January edition of Business Conditions Monthly, out this week.
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by Aaron Nathans

As our Bob Hughes says, “Along with our business-cycle conditions model, we continue to look at all the data with the same perspective, the same analytical framework. We’re looking for that weakness to spread, or hopefully not spread.”
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Amid good signs like the strong employment report, we have also seen some “yellow flag” data sets on the economy in recent weeks..
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by Forest Davis-Hollander

We are all reasonably familiar with the idea of Social Security: You pay money in while you’re working and you get something back when you’re retired. But the system is complex, and even the most basic rules are misunderstood by a large segment of the population..
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Since Ted Williams’ magical 1941 season, no professional baseball player has batted .400. Although the aggregate professional batting average has remained stable at around .250, the variability of batting averages has declined as all players have become more skilled. We can apply the same lesson to investing.
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Great Barrington, MA
01230-1000
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