“In October, America’s longest war, the war in Afghanistan, will enter its 16th year. With American troops fighting not only in Afghanistan,

Christopher A, Preble and Emma Ashford write:

“In October, America’s longest war, the war in Afghanistan, will enter its 16th year. With American troops fighting not only in Afghanistan, but in Iraq, Syria, Libya, and elsewhere, foreign policy should be a major topic of discussion during the Democratic National Convention and overall this election year. Unfortunately, neither Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump advocate a foreign policy that the American people want.

Trump can certainly be credited with shaking up the foreign policy debate during the primary season. Simply by expressing ideas that differ from Republican foreign policy dogma — for example, that the Iraq war was a mistake — he gave voice to the frustration many voters feel toward the elites that make U.S. foreign policy. Indeed, Trump’s statements on the Iraq war, NATO, and Russia implied to some that he might fire the establishment and pursue a less interventionist foreign policy.

Appearances are deceiving. While Trump’s proposals are occasionally restrained, they are more often deranged. From promises to send 30,000 U.S. troops to fight ISIS — quickly retracted — to pledges to seize Middle Eastern oil reserves, to calls for indiscriminate bombing of suspected terrorist sites, which would also kill innocent civilians, many of his foreign policy pronouncements have illustrated a bellicose and militaristic worldview. Voters should be worried: Trump’s approach to foreign policy is incoherent at best, and dangerous at worst.

Neither Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump advocate a foreign policy that the American people want. Troublingly, it’s not clear that Clinton’s is much better.” Read more…

COMMENTARY

Will Kaine Push for War Powers Reform?
by Gene Healy on CNN.comHillary Clinton put an end to the vice presidential speculation Friday, picking the congenitally congenial Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA) as her running mate. The junior senator from Virginia isn’t known for generating passionate intensity: “I am boring,” he recently admitted on Meet the Press. But after the sturm und drang of the GOP Convention, Clinton’s betting a lot of voters will find “boring” reassuring.
Trump, Clinton, and Executive Power
by Michael D. Tanner on National Review (Online)If there was one single sentence in Donald Trump’s acceptance speech last week that summed up his entire campaign, it was this: “I alone can fix it.” Trump’s ideology may be amorphous, but he firmly believes in the “big man” school of politics. Like Putin, Erdogan, or the late Hugo Chávez, Trump sees himself as Horatius at the Bridge, the only thing standing between us and the dystopian future of his nightmares.

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